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Monthly Archives: September 2013

  • 268a-unsafecars
    268a-unsafecars
  • 268b-Unsafecars
    268b-Unsafecars

1997 GMC Safari

Richard Farrell, owner of Richard’s Rolling Repairs in Richmond, British Columbia came across this 97 Safari van. After diagnosing a spongey brake pedal, he submitted the story to our Eye Spy collection. He found that the front chamber of the master cylinder was empty, and the brake fluid stains on the left rear backing plate and wheel were already dry.

  • 295a-UnsafeCars
    295a-UnsafeCars
  • 295b-UnsafeCars
    295b-UnsafeCars
  • 295c-UnsafeCars
    295c-UnsafeCars
  • 295d-UnsafeCars
    295d-UnsafeCars

2002 Chrysler Sebring

Geoff Last, an apprentice at K.I.S.S. Auto Repairs in Kelowna, B.C. added this photo to our Eye Spy collection. This is a classic case of a DIY job gone wrong, and ended up costing way more than the owner could have hoped to save. The owner of this 2002 Sebring convertible had tried to diagnose and repair a no-crank condition, and ended up destroying the ignition cylinder. There’s so much to say about this unsafe repair! Read the story here.

  • 291-UnsafeCars
    291-UnsafeCars

2005 Ford F-150

After experiencing some serious braking issues, the owner of this 2005 Ford F-150 brought his truck to the professionals at Frank Malfara Service Centre in Burlington, Ont. Patrick Roberts, the technician who inspected the truck added this photo to our Eye Spy collection. He quickly found that when the owner attempted to install his own brakes, he forgot to put the right rear caliper back on. To read more about this forgetful DIY brake job, click here.

2008 Mazda B3000

The DIYer who attempted this brake job has some backwards thinking about safety. Rob Stortz, operations manager at Columbia Auto Service in Waterloo, Ontario added this photo to Canadian Technician’s Eye Spy collection.

  • 224a-Unsafe
    224a-Unsafe
  • 224b-Unsafe
    224b-Unsafe
  • 224c-Unsafe
    224c-Unsafe
  • 224d-Unsafe
    224d-Unsafe

1992 Buick Roadmaster wagon

In this business, we see neglect, damage, and corrosion all the time. But keeping the vehicle on the road is only good for the customer if it’s safe to drive! Here’s a good example from our EyeSpy collection, thanks to David Fenton of Lakerange Service in Port Elgin, Ont.

2002 Volkswagen Golf

This car came into a Pennzoil 10 minute oil change in Gatineau, Quebec. The owner had new tires in the trunk, but didn’t want them installed. General manager, Jon Hover tried to explain to the customer how dangerous the tire was but he had little success getting the message across.

2004 Ford Ranger

The owner of this Ford F-150 decided he could do his own brake work and replaced the rotors. Unfortunately, he picked the wrong ones. They were a full inch too small and had no ABS tone rings on the hub. Tom Hines, of Fountain Tire Richmond in Vancouver, B.C. submitted this photo to our Eye Spy collection.

  • 269a-UnsafeCars
    269a-UnsafeCars
  • 269b-unsafecars
    269b-unsafecars

2001 Chrysler Sebring

Jay Ball of Jed’s Auto Repair in Cape Breton, Nova Scotia submitted this case to our Eye Spy collection. The ball joints on this Chrysler Sebring were held together with zip ties.

  • 279a-UnsafeCars
    279a-UnsafeCars
  • 279b-UnsafeCars
    279b-UnsafeCars
  • 279c-UnsafeCars
    279c-UnsafeCars
  • 279d-UnsafeCars
    279d-UnsafeCars

1997 Ford F-150

This 1997 Ford F-150 came into Budget Brake and Muffler in Red Deer, Alberta. The technician, Craig Smith found two c-clamps holding the left manifold flange together.

  • 300a-UnsafeCars
    300a-UnsafeCars
  • 300b-UnsafeCars
    300b-UnsafeCars

1965 Ford Mustang

Tim Scratch, the general manager of K-W Spring and Suspension came across this odd modification on a 1965 Mustang. He added these photos to our Eye Spy collection. The previous owner of the vehicle attempted to lower the rear suspension with blocks of wood. The scariest part is that this Mustang received a safety certificate in its condition!